Tonnes of drugs burnt in Siem Reap

Tonnes of drugs burnt in Siem Reap More than 10 tonnes of drugs which were seized in Siem Reap, Kampong Thom and Preah Vihear provinces were destroyed in Siem Reap on Friday.

Deputy Siem Reap provincial police chief Brigadier General Oum Mara said 10,893kg of the methamphetamine drug were burnt on Friday.

Secretary-general of National Authority for Combating Drugs (NACD) Meas Virith said at the event that authorities must continue the war against drugs.

Tonnes of drugs burnt in Siem Reap “They must crack down on drug dealers and traffickers and they must step up efforts,” he said at the event to burn the drugs

According to NACD, authorities conducted 6,308 anti-drug operations and seized 2,782kg of ketamine, 947kg of methamphetamine, 556kg of ecstasy, 275kg of heroin and 106kg of carnitine.

The Apsara National Authority (ANA) announced the completion of the restoration work on the Chao Srey Vibol temple’s West Gate, while the second phase of Angkor Wat’s southwest embankment restoration project is set to be completed in the near future.

In a Facebook post on July 15, the ANA said that restoration work on the Chao Srey Vibol temple’s West Gate began in 2020 and was just completed recently.

It said that the restoration team used the anastylosis method during the two-year restoration process due to the damaged condition of the entire gate structure.

Anastylosis is an archaeological term for the reconstruction technique whereby a ruined building or monument is restored using the original architectural elements to the greatest degree possible – combined with modern materials where necessary – though ensuring that the latter are unobtrusive while clearly recognizable as replacement materials.

The team had completely dismantled the gate to restore the broken stones and strengthen the foundations. They then reassembled the gate into its original form.

Meanwhile, the second phase of Angkor Wat’s southwest embankment restoration project is set to be completed soon.

ANA archaeologist Sorn Chanthon said that 90 per cent of the restoration work is completed and the project is scheduled to wrap-up by the end of this week.

He said that the total length of the embankment is 140 metres, but 80 metres of it was completed in the first phase, while the second phase covered the other 60 metres.

He said the restoration work in the second phase dealt with parts that were dilapidated due to age, which required strengthening the foundations of the embankment to prevent further landslides. The embankment platform was still solid, but the restoration team needed to put soil in place to support the dilapidated parts on top of it.

According to Chanthon, a restoration plan for the other parts of the embankment is already in place and work will begin soon.